Techniques & Measurements

This page lists techniques and measurements employed by
the isolatedHEART perfusion system.

Langendorff perfusion mode

Langendorff heart perfusion mode

In the Langendorff heart perfusion mode, the perfusate is pumped through the aorta towards the heart. Because of this retrograde perfusion, the liquid does not enter the left ventricle but is diverted into the coronary arteries. This mode, which is easier to implement, enables the study of heart contraction, heart rate and vascular reactivity. It is ideal for investigating intraventricular pressure, cardiac contractility and relaxation, electrical conduction and coronary flow.

Outcomes
  • Perfusion flow (coronary)
  • Perfusion pressure
  • Left ventricular pressure by latex balloon
  • Temperature
  • ECG with or without pacing, Intracardiac ECG/stimulation
  • pH, pO2
  • MAP, VAP (with contact micro electrodes)
  • Pressure-volume loops
Did you know?

The first isolated perfused heart system was developed by Carl Ludwig and Elias Cyon in 1866 using a frog heart preparation

References
Working Heart perfusion mode

Working Heart

In the working heart perfusion mode, the flow of perfusate mimics the flow of blood in situ. The perfusate enters the left atrium via the pulmonary vein and is pumped into the left ventricle then ejected into the aorta, against a resistance that mimics the global resistance of the body (afterload).

As the name implies, this technique allows the heart to perform its physiological pumping action, i.e. it performs pressure/volume work. Therefore, it provides a complete analysis of heart function and can be used to study cardiac metabolism, long-term pathology or ischemia-reperfusion.

Outcomes
  • Perfusion flow (coronary and aortic)
  • Perfusion pressure (veinous atrial pressure)
  • Afterload pressure (mimic the load created by the complete artery network)
  • Left ventricular pressure by PTFE catheter
  • Temperature
  • ECG with or without pacing, Intracardiac ECG/stimulation
  • pH, pO2
  • MAP, VAP (with contact micro electrodes)
  • Atrial flow with Transonic flowmeter
  • Pressure-volume loops
References

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